“Homeschool moms love planning more than the actual homeschooling.” — I’m not sure who said that, but sometimes it’s true.

Proverbs, Bible, Catechism are for everyone.

Spanish – We use Speaking Spanish with Miss Mason and Francois

Pilgrim’s Progress – we have an old copy. We may be switching to Dangerous Journey soon.

Poetry – We follow Ambleside’s poetry rotation depending on the year my kids are in.

Shakespeare – Ambleside Shakespeare Rotation. (Usually)

Free Read –  a book I pick that I want us to read aloud together.

Halliburton – His “Book of Marvels.”

Art Study – Ambleside’s Art Rotation – using a study guide from either Humble Place or Simply Charlotte Mason.

Composer – Reading a book about our composer, chosen from Ambleside’s Composer Study.

Art Instruction – You Tube Videos, usually connected to another topic. More on that later.

Geography – From from both Home Geography for Primary Grades by Long, and/or Elementary Geography by Charlotte Mason 

Plutarch – We used Anne White’s Study Guides. This is aimed at my older kids, but the younger one listens, too.

Nature Study – Using Anne Comstock’s book as a guide plus the Ambleside Nature Rotation.

Dictation – For my oldest, we had to add Diction to the list so we would remember to do it.

Morning Time

“Morning Time,” while not strictly Charlotte Mason, is an essential part of our homeschool. It’s the time that we read the Bible together, do any lessons that all the kids need, and review our day so everyone knows what to expect.

And this week I’m planning for next term.

To keep myself as organized as possible, I make a list of goals for each week. Ambleside runs 12 week terms, so I work in 12 week chunks.

I print one page for each week. Each pages as a “daily” section and a “weekly section.” We do the daily items daily and try to get in 2 weekly items per day.

Daily sample:

Proverbs

Bible Verses

Catechism

Spanish-imperatives

Pilgrim’s Progress (10 pages per week)

Poetry – Whitcomb-Riley and Whittier

Shakespeare – Two Gentlemen – 1 scene per day

Two from weekly list

Free Read

Weekly sample:

Halliburton

Art Study – Botticelli

Composer – Bach

Art Instruction –  TBD

Geography – TBD

Plutarch-Pompey

Nature Study – soil/erosion

Dictation (x3)

Look mysterious? Over the next few months, I’ll be posting more about each of our morning time activities. I hope these ideas may help you on your homeschool journey!

 

For an excellent podcast about morning time

Check out Cindy Rollins – The New Mason Jar or Pam Barnhill’s Your Morning Basket. Both have seriously influenced my homeschool journey in a big way.

For further reading on Charlotte Mason

You can always read Charlotte’s words herself for free on the web, or check out Susan Schaffer Macauley’s For the Children’s Sake

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I’m really making some progress reading Les Mis.  Here are five facts about the book.  The first three don’t spoil any plot points.  The last two may.:

1. Les Mis is very long because Victor Hugo included lots and lots of historical facts.  There are entire chapters of historical facts with maybe one line of character development.

2. While Les Mis is long, Hugo broke it down into small chunks.  It consists of 5 volumes.  Each volume contains 8 to 15 books.  Each book contains 2 to 24 chapters.  On the new Kindle, it will gauge how fast you read and tell you about how much time you have left in each chapter.  It’s the best feature ever.  I can read most chapters in about 5 minutes and when you chip away at it like that, it goes quickly.

3. The free Kindle edition is abridged.  Abridged is lame.  Read the Unabridged version and skim the bits that you don’t care to read. On Kindle, it cost $3.  Hapgood is the translator I’m reading and honestly, the writing is interesting enough that even the historical bits with no character development are still good to read.

Spoiler Alert:

4. Valjean’s backstory is pretty much the same in the book and the musical.  We learn a bit more about his sister in the book.  When they lived together, she had lots of kids and he was helping raise them.  While in prison, Valjean learns that she only has one child with her and no one knows what happened to the others.  The little boy that’s left has to wait outside for an hour every day waiting for his school to open, even in the rain.  Even in the tiny stories and asides in the novel, everyone’s life is miserable.

5. The biggest shocker of the novel so far: Fantine is blonde!  Hugo mentions it more than once.  And after you read about Fantine’s back story, her fate is even sadder.  I can’t explain the whole story here because I’m in the middle of it.  More later, perhaps.

CurlyBlondwebIn honor of blonde Fantine, here is a new blonde girl, drawn on my tablet.  This is not meant to be Fantine.  I just like drawing curly hair and wanted to try it out digitally.