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Read the Play

This term, we are reading Romeo and Juliet. It’s a re-read for us – but that’s good. We love re-reading Shakespeare plays. Every time we notice new themes and have more to talk about – new ways to dig in.

Folger Shakespeare Library Mass Market editions are quickly becoming my favorite editions. They have lots of notes and always start with insightful commentary.

Don’t get a kindle version. You need a print copy. In fact, each student needs a print copy.

Bookshop.org

Watch a Movie

Romeo and Juliet is the best for movie watching. There are so many great options. The Baz Luhrmann version is our favorite, but if you want something not so loud, try this version. But pre-screen if you have young children.

It’s also easy to find colleges who recorded their Shakespeare plays and put them online. Those are free and easy to find.

Build Community

Romeo and Juliet is a popular play and it’s likely that other people in your homeschool community may be reading it, or willing to read it, and then come over for some Shakespeare fun. 

We once hosted a Romeo and Juliet fun day. We read portions of the play, had a soccer game (Capulets vs. Montagues), and ate Italian food. Everything is better with food. 

So reach out to your homeschool friends and see how you can interact with this play together.

 

Another great resource for parents teaching Romeo and Juliet is The Play’s the Thing. In 2021, they read the play act by act and discussed it. We read it that semester and listened along. My high school student, in particular, got into the discussions about Romeo and Juliet’s love – is it transcendent? Or just immature teenagers choosing desire over duty? Listen along and discuss with your students.

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